Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Marissa Meyer’

Cinderella is an Android! – My Book Review of Cinder

August 23rd, 2016 No comments

Cover of Cinder by Marissa MeyerCinderella has come a long way from being the timid little servant I remember from my Disney-soaked childhood. In Cinder by smash hit author Marissa Meyer, our heroine isn’t exactly relegated to singing sweet melodies to her animal friends while she mournfully sweeps and cleans. Instead, “Cinder” is a well-known mechanic in New Beijing, where she fixes broken net screens and reboots burned out robots. Scratch the “timid” from her personality, and while we’re making changes, I should mention that Cinder isn’t exactly human, either. There’s a reason she knows her way around wires, circuits, and computer chips.

Cinder’s world is anything but a fairytale. Meyer takes us into a future that is slightly more technically advanced than our own but crippled by a terrible, incurable plague. Also, there are those pesky Lunars on the moon, led by an evil Queen intent on taking over the earth.

None of this is really Cinder’s business, until handsome Prince Kai stops by her mechanic booth requesting help to repair his robot…a robot that holds some very big secrets. This meeting lights the candle of a growing romance that Cinder refuses to recognize. She knows the prince would despise her if he ever realized what she really was.

If you’re wondering where the evil stepmother comes in, don’t worry, she’s there, and she throws plenty of wrenches into Cinder’s life, least of all forcefully volunteering her stepdaughter for plague research…of which none survive. The research, conducted at the castle, because…uh….uh….because, allows Cinder to bump in Kai again (and again) and also paves the way for some big discoveries about Cinder’s shrouded past.

Cinder is a fun, fast-paced adventure. Meyer’s world is unique but somehow instantly recognizable. We may be in the future, but her characters face age old trials and tribulations (though Cinder’s struggle with her too-small android foot is a bit of a unique situation). I found myself immersed in this story and made it easily to the end, even if I had some WTF moments along the way…like, if Cinder’s stepmother refused to buy her a new, correctly-sized android foot, then why wasn’t her android leg and android hand also extremely small?

I was also flummoxed by the fact that Prince Kai, always so burdened with the need to protect his people, would somehow think it was a grand idea to pack half the city into the castle for a ball…in the middle of a rampant, highly contagious plague! I’m not sure if New Beijing has a version of the CDC, but if they do, I’m pretty sure that idea would be quashed in a second.

Cinder’s biggest failing in my opinion, however, is a lackluster cast of characters. The evil Lunar queen is pretty much just completely and utterly evil for no discernable reason except that perhaps evilness is in vogue on the lunar surface. Prince Kai, as well, seems to have less personality than Cinder’s spunky robot friend, Iko. His sole character feature seems to be that he’s a decent guy.

Despite these hiccups, Cinder offers readers a unique twist on an old story that, overall, I enjoyed reading. As soon as I was done, I promptly placed the next book in the series, Scarlet, on hold. I’m looking forward to the continuation of Cinder’s adventures and to meeting a new character, Scarlet.

Rating: Four Stars

Who Should Read: Perfect for teens who enjoy a strong heroine who prefers rumpled, oil-stained clothes to gaudy dresses and who occasionally loses her body parts.